Fukushima

1 Jahr Fukushima: Weiterhin grosse Anstrengungen bei Aufräumarbeiten

Directly after the accident in Japan’s Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant on 11 March 2011, ENSI ordered immediate measures for a review of the safety of the Swiss nuclear power plants.

In parallel, an interdisciplinary team of experts from ENSI (the “Japan Analysis Team”) reconstructed the events of the accident and subjected them to in-depth analysis.

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News

Logo OECD

At the OECD Forum in Paris, ENSI Director Hans Wanner argued for a strengthening of the international monitoring of nuclear power. This followed comments by the Swiss Federal Councillor Doris Leuthard at yesterday’s meeting of minsters from the G8 and G20 countries on nuclear safety in Paris during which she called for internationally binding safety standards. Compliance with such standards should be monitored by independent inspectors from other countries and in the interests of transparency the IAEA, the International Atomic Energy Agency should facilitate easy access to the results.

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Background Articles

Nine months after the disaster at the Fukushima nuclear power plant, Japan is working to contain radiation exposure in the region of the accident. The challenges confronting the country in this endeavour are shown by the new ENSI report on the radiological effects of the accident on 11 March 2011. ENSI already deduced some “Lessons learned for Swiss radiation protection” at the end of October.

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fukushima-iii

The analysis of the accidents at Fukushima confirms that Swiss nuclear plants are safe. However, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) has identified a variety of findings (Lessons Learned) from Fukushima which should now be utilised to continue optimising the safety of Switzerland’s nuclear power plants. All the measures that need to be implemented on the basis of these findings should be in place by 2015.

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Aufräumarbeiten Fukushima

Inadequate technical design against tsunamis was indisputably a key factor in the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plants on 11 March 2011. In order to understand the scope and complexity of the event, an interdisciplinary analysis team was formed at ENSI. Its members include (for example) experts in the fields of people and organisation, […]

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Documents

Implementation status in Switzerland of International Recommendations: ENSREG recommendations CNS 2nd Extraordinary Meeting recommendations IAEA Action Plan recommendations for Members States List of checkpoints from the Swiss “Lessons Learned” report List of open points for Switzerland from the EU Stress Tests

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The Fukushima action plans serve the purpose of ensuring transparency as regards processing of the identified points until they are implemented. They also provide an instrument for the planning of supervisory work and the assessment of new knowledge gained from the Fukushima accident. In 2014, ENSI is focussing on the pursuit of ongoing work as […]

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The Fukushima action plans serve the purpose of ensuring transparency as regards processing of the identified points until they are implemented. They also provide an instrument for the planning of supervisory work and the assessment of new knowledge gained from the Fukushima accident. Progress with processing the identified points is documented and published. The action […]

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Nine months after the disaster at the Fukushima nuclear power plant, Japan is working to contain radiation exposure in the region of the accident. The challenges confronting the country in this endeavour are shown by the new ENSI report on the radiological effects of the accident on 11 March 2011. A significant discharge of radioactivity […]

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The analysis of the accidents at Fukushima confirms that Swiss nuclear plants are safe. However, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) has identified a variety of findings (Lessons Learned) from Fukushima which should now be utilised to continue optimising the safety of Switzerland’s nuclear power plants. All the measures that need to be implemented […]

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Some initial and provisional explanations as to why the design defects came about and why the accident progressed in such a catastrophic manner are presented by the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) in its reports which examines the circumstances before, during and after the accident. In order to understand the scope and complexity of […]

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Immediately after the first live images of the accident in the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant were broadcast all over the world on 11 March 2011, the Swiss Federal Nuclear Safety Inspectorate (ENSI) convened a group of internal experts comprising engineers, geophysicists, nuclear physicists and psychologists. A state of emergency was declared for Fukushima Dai-ichi […]

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